Retailer Spotlight: Couch’s Jewelers

Outside pic with national historic Register (760x300) 

Founded in 1941, Couch’s Jewelers  has been located in downtown Anniston on the same street for over 72 years. Authenticity is the core of who they are and everything they do. At Couch’s Jewelers they embrace change, forward thinking and provide their customers with exceptional service that always exceeds their expectations. Couch’s Jewelers is not just a business they are a family.

Three generations (760x300) (2)

Couch’s likes to stay current with all trends.  At the moment they love all the colors available in colored stones and natural stones.  They say “There are so many choices and they all pair so nicely with every outfit in your closet”.

We asked Couch’s Jewelers what they had to say about us and their response is, “Nina’s unique designs are so fashion forward, which appeals to every age group. Couch’s has always brought unique lines to the Anniston area, and Nina Nguyen may just be the most unique one yet”.

Couch's Invite Website

Join Couch’s Jewelers for a Nina Nguyen Designs launch event on Saturday, December 7, from 12pm – 7pm. Show your support for local Anniston non-profit organization, the Knox Concert Series , and see Nina’s beautiful collection of jewelry. Couch’s Jewelers, along with Nina Nguyen Designs has selected the The Nutcracker Ballet project – performance and educational outreach, as the beneficiary of a generous contribution from Couch’s Jewelers and Internationally renowned designer Nina Nguyen. The contribution will come from money raised through sales of a limited number of tickets, good for a chance to win a special piece of designer jewelry donated by Nina Nguyen, and available only on Saturday, December 7, 2013 from 12pm – 7pm at Couch’s Jewelers.

Call Couch’s at (256) 237-4628 and confirm your attendance to the event and to meet Nina!

Wisteria: A Whimiscal New Collection By Nina Nguyen Designs

Depending on where you live, you may well know the magical beauty of Wisteria. — It has a sweetly intoxicating fragrance emanating from white, blue, purple or Lilac flowers with cascading petals. And vines that are strong enough to pull down buildings.

kawachi-fuji-garden-kitakyushu-japan-wisteria-5

Wisteria flower tunnel at Kawachi Fuji Garden in Kitakyushu, Japan.

Nina Nguyen discovered Wisteria while bicycling around Tokyo in 2005. She was immediately captivated by its vibrant color and delicate, whimsical flowers cascading down.

Nina’s memories of Japan deeply inspired Nina Nguyen Design’s coming Fall 2013 collection, has been she named Wisteria in homage to its wistful color and style.

8276 Hi Res

The pieces in the collection are both delicate and graceful in design, yet timeless in their beauty. Like the Wisteria vines, which wrap around trees and trellises, the pieces – dubbed ‘necklettes’ – can be wrapped as a bracelet or worn as one-strand or multiple-strand necklaces.

Recently Nina has also collaborated with renowned high-fashion photographer Joanna Kustra to capture the beauty of Wisteria and her other collections in photographs. Nina traveled to London to work with Joanna, and the result of their collaboration is simply mesmerizing.

2013 FALL (9) 72 DPI

As Nina discovered in Tokyo, Wisteria grows plentifully in Japan, where it is seen as a symbol of love and victory over hardship. Wisteria is allowed to grow wild in many places in Japan and can be seen twining up and around through trees, especially in the mountains.

wisteria combo

For Nina, Wisteria symbolizes many of the qualities shared by women around the world – love, grace, honor, strength and passion. It also personifies her own creative expansion, as each of her collections grows organically from her own experiences and interests.

In coming weeks, she’ll share more of her 2014 Wisteria-inspired collection here on the Nina Nguyen Designs blog. Check back soon to see more of Wisteria’s wistful beauty!

Happy New Year!!!

ImageChuc mung nam moi!!!

I know it’s the middle of February, however, today is the 1st of the Lunar New Year.  2013 is the year of the snake according to the Lunar Calendar which is celebrated by many Asian countries.
Vietnamese culture is heavily influenced by Chinese culture because the China dominated Vietnam from 111 BC to 938 CE (there are some brief years of independence)
“The Chinese calendar is based on a combination of lunar and solar movements. The lunar cycle is about 29.5 days. In order to “catch up” with the solar calendar the Chinese insert an extra month once every few years (seven years out of a 19-yearcycle). This is the same as adding an extra day on leap year. This is why, according to the solar calendar, the Chinese New Year falls on a different date each year.
New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day are celebrated as a family affair, a time of reunion and thanksgiving. The celebration was traditionally highlighted with a religious ceremony given in honor of Heaven and Earth, the gods of the household and the family ancestors.”

Growing up in Vietnam, there is only one holiday per year and that is the New Year Holiday.  It is a combination of Thanksgiving, New Years and Christmas for us.  It’s a big deal because this is the holiday that I’m given my new clothes that are expected to last for the rest of year.  Money was also a popular gift from adult friends of the family to children.  Lunar New Year is the most exciting and festive time of year.  Everyone is in good spirits, especially my parents!

On the the eve of the New Year, the family participates in the tea ceremony and waits for midnight to start the firecrackers.  After the noise and smoke clear, the children traditionally wish their parents and elderly a happy, healthy and prosperous new year.
“Con chuc ba ma nam moi vui ve, manh khoe, lam an phat dac”  translation: “I wish you (the parents) a happy, healthy and prosperous new year”
It is expected for the children to get their New Years greeting right.  The better the greeting the more red envelopes or bigger red envelope one receives.  These red envelopes were such great motivators for me to get my greeting right because inside those red envelopes was money.  I had a very hungry piggy bank to feed so I always practiced my greeting.  I think that was the beginning of my sibling rivalry in my family.
For the next 3 days of festivities, the whole country goes on and celebrates the tradition that has been celebrated for more than a thousand years.  Some of the practices are:
– Caramelized Fruit Candy (muc) – Lots of westerners would describe it as very sweet but for me it was a once a year special treat and was something my mother would spend an entire evening making and preparing for the holiday. I used to fall asleep right next to a char grill watching the fruit slowly caramelize and harden often taking up to 10 hours to complete.

– Gift exchange
– New clothes
– Family Portrait.
– Flowers
Plum Blossoms symbolizes luckiness
Kumquat symbolizes prosperity
Narcissus symbolizes prosperity

                Bamboo plant used for any time of year

Sunflower means to have a good year
Eggplant to heal all of your sicknesses
Chom Mon Planta which gives you tranquility
– Firecrackers (phao)
– Lion dance (mua lang) – I always love this and still enjoy watching this to this day.

I am so fortunate to have two culture that I can call home.